dvd sales

dvds sale

DVD Sales

Home DVD Sales Falling

By Dedy

Executive Summary About DVD Sales By Eric Bangema

dvds saleAlthough Hollywood has taken a beating at the box office this year, with revenues down sharply from 2004, there’s always the promise of strong DVD sales for popular titles, right?

Right?

Maybe not anymore, as sales of theatrical releases to consumers have taken an unexpected nosedive (registration required). 11 days earlier, Pixar issued a similar warning because of slow “The Incredibles” DVD sales.

An entertainment industry analyst at Forrester Research remarked that he didn’t believe that illicit movie downloads were having a “measurable effect” on DVD sales.

Video on demand has become more popular, and such offerings from DirecTV, Charter, Comcast, and others have eaten away at DVD sales. In addition to near-satiated demand for older titles, other factors are driving sales of DVDs downwards. Lastly, the problem facing advertisers and TV networks–people spending less time watching the idiot box in favor of the Internet or videogames–applies to watching movies as well.

Changes in consumer purchasing habits, once they are identified by the film industry, could lead to some changes in movie release methodology and delivery modes.

Offering a movie for sale on DVD (but not for rental) while it is still in the theaters might entice some to drop a few bucks on a DVD purchase and a movie ticket instead of ticket now and rental later.

With DVD Sales Declining, Movie Studios Unite with Cable Operators in Support of VOD

Executive Summary About DVD Sales  By Michael Grotticelli

For years, the motion picture studios treated video-on-demand (VOD) services with little fanfare. Growing DVD sales are over, and DVD rental companies are on life support.

On-demand VOD usage soared 20 percent last year, the “New York Times” reported. On-demand rentals are also more profitable for studios than traditional rental options. While Blockbuster gave the movie studios about 25 cents of every dollar spent on movie rentals, VOD services deliver as much as 65 cents of every dollar to the studios.

It was found that simultaneous VOD does not cannibalize DVD sales. “Improvements in technology, the instant availability of the most recent box-office hits and thousands of library titles have fundamentally changed viewing patterns,” Derek Harrar, Comcast’s senior vice president for video and entertainment services, told the “New York Times.”

Studios participating in the VOD promotion include Warner, 20th Century Fox, Focus Features, Lionsgate, Rogue, Sony Pictures, Summit Entertainment and Universal. Cable partners include Armstrong, BendBroadband, Brighthouse, the iO digital unit of Cablevision, Comcast, Cox, Insight and Time Warner.

Check out my other guide on DVDs storage

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